Why You Should Care About Zoo Animals

This week, zoo animals are under attack.

There are now reports of an epidemic of rhino attacks, and animal activists are taking a stand against the rampant poaching that threatens the endangered animals.

The first animal activists have joined forces with the zoo, which announced plans to make the world’s largest indoor exhibit to house rhino, zebra and elephant in a “safe, secure, and caring environment” on Wednesday.

But while the new initiative aims to stop the animals from suffering, it may not stop them from suffering from the climate change that’s making it even more difficult to rehabilitate the animals.

According to the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), there’s a growing concern that the rhino poaching epidemic is already having a “chilling effect on rhino populations worldwide.”

In addition to poaching, rhino habitat loss and habitat loss due to overgrazing have been blamed for the disease and other environmental impacts that have hit the species.

But there are no easy solutions.

“The problem with rhino is that rhinos are so hard to rehabilitated because they’re so hard-to-treat, and they have this immune system that’s been designed to fight diseases,” said Tom Pugh, a senior lecturer at the University of Reading.

“When you put them in a facility that’s too harsh, they’re not going to recover.”

In the past year, rhinos have been killed at an alarming rate in Namibia, Botswana, Zimbabwe and Zimbabwe, according to a new report from the Zoological Society of London.

In Botswana alone, the report found that more than 1,200 rhinos were killed in the country during the past two years.

And a recent report from Conservation International found that rhino numbers in South Africa had dropped from 3,700 in 2013 to 1,000 in 2015.

“There is a growing belief that poaching is causing rhino population to plummet,” Pugh said.

“If you look at the data and look at how the rhinos themselves have been affected by poaching, it’s not a good situation.”

One of the main reasons rhinos aren’t getting the help they need is because of the way rhino horns are treated, Pugh explained.

“They’re used as a hunting weapon in Asia, and that’s a very big problem.

They’re often thrown into garbage bags or thrown into rivers,” Puddicombe said.

The United Nations says that over two million rhinos and rhino horn have been illegally exported around the world since 2009.

“It’s a big deal that we’re importing rhino parts,” Puddle said.

It’s not just a matter of keeping them in the wild.

“People don’t think about the fact that it’s killing these animals, it has been killing these elephants and it’s been killing rhinos,” Puthies said.

To make matters worse, there’s another problem.

The rhino trade has also become a huge business, Puddigie said.

While poachers are the primary threat, there are also dealers who make money from the trade.

“For the dealers, they make $100 million a year from poaching,” Puhie said, adding that there are now two major markets for rhino tusks.

“This is the second major market.

“So you’re looking at this industry being worth over $100 billion a year, with a little bit of profit going back to the dealers.” “

There’s no way to know how many rhinos the trade is taking, Puhies said, but it’s likely that the trade has increased dramatically in the past few years, making it easier for poachers to get their hands on the animals and get paid for it. “

So you’re looking at this industry being worth over $100 billion a year, with a little bit of profit going back to the dealers.”

There’s no way to know how many rhinos the trade is taking, Puhies said, but it’s likely that the trade has increased dramatically in the past few years, making it easier for poachers to get their hands on the animals and get paid for it.

“In the last three years, there have been rhino seizures of over 500 rhinos, and a lot of that rhinofarms has been sold to poachers,” Puck said.

As the rhinas in South Sudan, a country that has been devastated by the rhid incursion, are being targeted, the IUCN has warned that this “will lead to a mass extinction of rhinos.”

And while it’s difficult to say what the impact of the rhoocide will be, it is certain that it is going to make life for the animals even more challenging.

“We know that rhoecological issues, such as disease and habitat fragmentation, have been linked to rhino declines,” said IUCn spokesperson Liana Chiaramonte.

“As a result, the trade of rhinophones is also likely to continue, as it is the largest illicit export.”

This week the IPC